June 2022 newsletter

Kia ora koutou

MASTERCLASS COURSE PROFILE:
Leading in a multi-agency response and recovery environment

The RRANZ team are strong believers in continuous professional development so have developed these virtual 6-hour facilitator-led masterclasses to continually build and refresh the skills of the EM sector.

This course focuses on mobilising and managing high-functioning teams to operate effectively in any disaster or crisis and optimising performance across interdependent teams.

Limited places are available for the next course on 28/29 July.

The RRANZ team are strong believers in continuous professional development so have developed these virtual 6-hour facilitator-led masterclasses to continually build and refresh the skills of the EM sector.

This course focuses on mobilising and managing high-functioning teams to operate effectively in any disaster or crisis and optimising performance across interdependent teams.

Limited places are available for the next course on 28/29 July.

Find out more and register online


MEET THE RRANZ TEAM: Tracy Hatton

Tracy was born in the UK, and emigrated to NZ when she was 3. After an extended OE (10 years), she returned with her husband Gary and baby bump Oliver to beautiful Otautahi in 2007. Tracy was completing an MBA at the time of the Canterbury earthquakes, and it was the impact of this event that led Tracy to complete a PhD on business recovery from the earthquakes.

Since 2015, Tracy has been immersed in all things relating to risk and resilience, including risk reduction, crisis readiness, and adaptation planning. Project highlights include visiting Uganda to work with the Red Cross on SME resilience, creating a Potable Water Resilience Primer for The Resilience Shift and measuring the resilience of Australian critical infrastructure sectors. Tracy is now the joint managing director of Resilient Organisations, co-leading a vibrant team carrying out consulting, research, and training.

When she’s not working, she loves dog walking with her Spanador (chocolate lab/springer spaniel) Sparky, planning where to travel next, bike adventuring, or reading a totally irrelevant nonfiction book.


OUR INSIGHTS FROM FACILITATING DEBRIEFS DURING COVID

Having facilitated a number of emergency management debriefs during Covid, Dave and Tracy share their key insights, themes, and takeouts from these sessions.

1.  Plans need to be fit for their purpose

While a plan was never going to get any organisation through Covid, most organisations spent far too much time covering basics that a Crisis Management Co-ordination or Business Continuity Plan would have dealt with – roles/responsibilities, key priorities, critical activities, and resourcing levels. Locating plans was also an issue for some organisations, several had good H5N1 plans but no one knew they existed.

Organisations need to plan for the possible not the easy – also plans need to be regularly refreshed.

2.  Getting the right balance of communication is hard

Communication was found to be either too often, not often enough, too short, too detailed, one way rather than an exchange, too many channels, too few channels, and definitely more resources needed.

Communication is the main game, not an addendum, and needs to include customers, staff, contractors, suppliers, and regulators.

3. Leaders need to work on building the depth and culture to ensure the wellbeing of their team

While there are a lot of great leaders, they need to remember to invest in capability building as well as building operational rhythms and a culture that enables trust and empowers shared leadership. There was also confusion in some organisations as to whether this was a problem HR should lead.

Be clear in your planning about who leads in a disruptive event and ensure they have the capability and capacity for two weeks of intense operations.

4. Virtual coordination centres need to be carefully designed to ensure they work effectively

Operating a virtual co-ordination centre has consequences – both positive and negative. Many organisations need to work on designing virtual operations that maximise incidental encounters and assist with clocking off among other things.

Managing a virtual response team takes a considerable effort. It is important to maintain situational awareness and break down silos. Regularly shared briefings each day are essential.

5. Build external relationships before a crisis

Many organisations did not have the depth and variety of external relationships they needed to get them through Covid. The external relationships and partnerships called upon during Covid were in many cases quite different from traditional natural hazards.

Networks are essential in response operations. Building them before an event and identifying connectors is essential.

6. Forewarned is forearmed

Many organisations didn't take notice of Covid until the government reacted. This is too late as you are then behind the proactive organisations. In China, businesses were alarmed early and took action well before the government reacted.

Be proactive, build your sensing capability, and actively scan your environment, these are key tools to being forward-leaning.

Has your organisation captured lessons from their Covid response? Do you have a clear lesson learnt implementation plan with responsibilities assigned? 
Get in touch if you need help. Email Tracy Hatton  or Dave Parsons

And finally, laughter is a powerful antidote for stress ...

They say Covid-19, the novel coronavirus is one of the worst things that's happened in recent years, but if you think this is bad, just wait till you see the movie adaptation!

What’s the best way to watch a fly-fishing tournament? Live stream.

I’m an expert at picking leaves and heating them in water. It’s my special tea.

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